Go Vegan. Thank you!

My name is Erin, but everyone calls me Red and that's just fine with me.

I'm a certified VLCE and Vegan Nutrition Specialist, fitness professional, public speaker, writer, consultant, kitchen wrangler, problem solver, host of the popular vegan podcast Red Radio, and right-hand-woman to vegan Wunderkind Chef Jay Astafa. I also co-founded The Seed in 2012, and continue to organize events across North America.

By night I'm a muay Thai practitioner, runner, Bikram Yogini, and tattoo collector. I share my pad with a vegan human, a vegan dog, and two carnivorous cats… all rescued. I hail from Toronto, Canada but Brooklyn, NYC is home.

I hustle. Hard.

Try to keep up.

GLORY BE: Field Roast introduces NEW VEGAN CHEESE SLICES!

vegansaurus:

Can’t see the video? Watch it on Vegansaurus.com!

Field Roast has introduced a new line of vegan cheese, Chao Slices! We have yet to get our hands on some, but it should be in stores soon. And we’re thrilled that they’re now officially a “vegan meat and cheese” brand! Because YOU KNOW their veg sausages are FANTASMIC. And this cheese looks ooey-gooey-good!:

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COME AT ME, BRO!

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#YAAASSSBISH

soycrates:

What is a vegan?
Veganism is a philosophy and a way of living. A vegan is someone who seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.
This is different from someone who adopts a plant-based diet for health and fitness reasons, just like it would be different from someone who was allergic to animal products in food but used animal products and other methods of exploitation in their daily life, or someone who boycotted venues of animal captivity (zoos, circuses, etc.) but ate meat, dairy, and eggs. 
Why do people go vegan?
Preventing cruelty to animals is the major reason people choose to go vegan, although veganism is often motivated by other ethical factors, such as environmental concerns and humanitarian reasons.
About 60 billion land animals and over a trillion marine animals are used and killed as commodities to satisfy human taste preferences, with millions more being killed or exploited for fashion, entertainment, and research. We breed animals into existence at such an alarming rate that it not only affects their health, but the health of our environment and the sustainability of our society and lifestyle. The agricultural industries which facilitate animal cruelty maintain the worst documented treatment to human workers compared to other methods of agriculture. 
In a world that is beginning to show real support for environmental, humanitarian, and animal rights issues, veganism is the logical next step.
Isn’t it enough to be vegetarian, or do meat-free mondays?
The suffering caused by the dairy and egg industry is possibly less well publicised than the plight of factory farmed animals. The production of dairy products necessitates the death of countless male calves that are of no use to the dairy farmer, as well as the premature death of cows slaughtered when their milk production decreases. Similarly, in the egg industry, even ‘ethical’ or ‘free range’ eggs involve the killing of the unnecessary male chicks when just a day old, often being thrown alive into a shredder. These industries also contribute to the environmental impact of animal products, and take up valuable land.
When we realize that we care about these issues, it makes more sense that we should change our behaviour in ways that reflect our values rather than to make symbolic or temporary changes. We want our actions to have noticeable effects on the world around us, and though we can say “every little action helps”, we know it’s better to take more actions than fewer, and bigger actions than smaller.
With animal exploitation leading the climate crisis, contributing to poor resource management, human rights violations and severe animal abuse, it’s easy to get motivated enough to make the leap into veganism.
From a dietary perspective, is veganism healthy?
The American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada said in 2003 that properly planned plant-based diets were nutritionally adequate for all stages of life, including pregnancy and lactation; people avoiding meat and dairy products are reported to have lower death rates from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and fewer incidences of type 2 diabetes and prostate and colon cancers.
Protein (including all essential amino acids), iron, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin b12 can all be found in plant-based food products. Many staples of the average vegan food pantry are nutritionally fortified. Check out this website for more info.
Being vegan and eating a plant-based diet doesn’t guarantee good health, since there is plenty of vegan junk food on the market. Just like in a non-vegan dietary lifestyle, it is up to you whether or not personal health is your top priority.
Is veganism hard or expensive?
Some people claim veganism is unattainable because it is only for the middle-class or only for those with plenty of time on their hands. And while it takes a little time to research how and why one should go vegan, it can be a very inexpensive and rewarding lifestyle. If you’ve ever been told you can’t go vegan because of these reasons, there are plenty of resources out there to help you along the way and show you that veganism is accessible to a wide variety of people.
Where should I go to learn more about veganism?
Visit my FAQ on veganism or check out The Vegan Society (many of the statistics, definitions and explanations in this post are sourced from their website).
soycrates:

What is a vegan?
Veganism is a philosophy and a way of living. A vegan is someone who seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.
This is different from someone who adopts a plant-based diet for health and fitness reasons, just like it would be different from someone who was allergic to animal products in food but used animal products and other methods of exploitation in their daily life, or someone who boycotted venues of animal captivity (zoos, circuses, etc.) but ate meat, dairy, and eggs. 
Why do people go vegan?
Preventing cruelty to animals is the major reason people choose to go vegan, although veganism is often motivated by other ethical factors, such as environmental concerns and humanitarian reasons.
About 60 billion land animals and over a trillion marine animals are used and killed as commodities to satisfy human taste preferences, with millions more being killed or exploited for fashion, entertainment, and research. We breed animals into existence at such an alarming rate that it not only affects their health, but the health of our environment and the sustainability of our society and lifestyle. The agricultural industries which facilitate animal cruelty maintain the worst documented treatment to human workers compared to other methods of agriculture. 
In a world that is beginning to show real support for environmental, humanitarian, and animal rights issues, veganism is the logical next step.
Isn’t it enough to be vegetarian, or do meat-free mondays?
The suffering caused by the dairy and egg industry is possibly less well publicised than the plight of factory farmed animals. The production of dairy products necessitates the death of countless male calves that are of no use to the dairy farmer, as well as the premature death of cows slaughtered when their milk production decreases. Similarly, in the egg industry, even ‘ethical’ or ‘free range’ eggs involve the killing of the unnecessary male chicks when just a day old, often being thrown alive into a shredder. These industries also contribute to the environmental impact of animal products, and take up valuable land.
When we realize that we care about these issues, it makes more sense that we should change our behaviour in ways that reflect our values rather than to make symbolic or temporary changes. We want our actions to have noticeable effects on the world around us, and though we can say “every little action helps”, we know it’s better to take more actions than fewer, and bigger actions than smaller.
With animal exploitation leading the climate crisis, contributing to poor resource management, human rights violations and severe animal abuse, it’s easy to get motivated enough to make the leap into veganism.
From a dietary perspective, is veganism healthy?
The American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada said in 2003 that properly planned plant-based diets were nutritionally adequate for all stages of life, including pregnancy and lactation; people avoiding meat and dairy products are reported to have lower death rates from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and fewer incidences of type 2 diabetes and prostate and colon cancers.
Protein (including all essential amino acids), iron, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin b12 can all be found in plant-based food products. Many staples of the average vegan food pantry are nutritionally fortified. Check out this website for more info.
Being vegan and eating a plant-based diet doesn’t guarantee good health, since there is plenty of vegan junk food on the market. Just like in a non-vegan dietary lifestyle, it is up to you whether or not personal health is your top priority.
Is veganism hard or expensive?
Some people claim veganism is unattainable because it is only for the middle-class or only for those with plenty of time on their hands. And while it takes a little time to research how and why one should go vegan, it can be a very inexpensive and rewarding lifestyle. If you’ve ever been told you can’t go vegan because of these reasons, there are plenty of resources out there to help you along the way and show you that veganism is accessible to a wide variety of people.
Where should I go to learn more about veganism?
Visit my FAQ on veganism or check out The Vegan Society (many of the statistics, definitions and explanations in this post are sourced from their website).

soycrates:

What is a vegan?

Veganism is a philosophy and a way of living. A vegan is someone who seeks to exclude, as far as is possible and practicable, all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose.

This is different from someone who adopts a plant-based diet for health and fitness reasons, just like it would be different from someone who was allergic to animal products in food but used animal products and other methods of exploitation in their daily life, or someone who boycotted venues of animal captivity (zoos, circuses, etc.) but ate meat, dairy, and eggs. 

Why do people go vegan?

Preventing cruelty to animals is the major reason people choose to go vegan, although veganism is often motivated by other ethical factors, such as environmental concerns and humanitarian reasons.

About 60 billion land animals and over a trillion marine animals are used and killed as commodities to satisfy human taste preferences, with millions more being killed or exploited for fashion, entertainment, and research. We breed animals into existence at such an alarming rate that it not only affects their health, but the health of our environment and the sustainability of our society and lifestyle. The agricultural industries which facilitate animal cruelty maintain the worst documented treatment to human workers compared to other methods of agriculture. 

In a world that is beginning to show real support for environmental, humanitarian, and animal rights issues, veganism is the logical next step.

Isn’t it enough to be vegetarian, or do meat-free mondays?

The suffering caused by the dairy and egg industry is possibly less well publicised than the plight of factory farmed animals. The production of dairy products necessitates the death of countless male calves that are of no use to the dairy farmer, as well as the premature death of cows slaughtered when their milk production decreases. Similarly, in the egg industry, even ‘ethical’ or ‘free range’ eggs involve the killing of the unnecessary male chicks when just a day old, often being thrown alive into a shredder. These industries also contribute to the environmental impact of animal products, and take up valuable land.

When we realize that we care about these issues, it makes more sense that we should change our behaviour in ways that reflect our values rather than to make symbolic or temporary changes. We want our actions to have noticeable effects on the world around us, and though we can say “every little action helps”, we know it’s better to take more actions than fewer, and bigger actions than smaller.

With animal exploitation leading the climate crisis, contributing to poor resource management, human rights violations and severe animal abuse, it’s easy to get motivated enough to make the leap into veganism.

From a dietary perspective, is veganism healthy?

The American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada said in 2003 that properly planned plant-based diets were nutritionally adequate for all stages of life, including pregnancy and lactation; people avoiding meat and dairy products are reported to have lower death rates from ischemic heart disease, lower blood cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and fewer incidences of type 2 diabetes and prostate and colon cancers.

Protein (including all essential amino acids), iron, calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamin b12 can all be found in plant-based food products. Many staples of the average vegan food pantry are nutritionally fortified. Check out this website for more info.

Being vegan and eating a plant-based diet doesn’t guarantee good health, since there is plenty of vegan junk food on the market. Just like in a non-vegan dietary lifestyle, it is up to you whether or not personal health is your top priority.

Is veganism hard or expensive?

Some people claim veganism is unattainable because it is only for the middle-class or only for those with plenty of time on their hands. And while it takes a little time to research how and why one should go vegan, it can be a very inexpensive and rewarding lifestyle. If you’ve ever been told you can’t go vegan because of these reasons, there are plenty of resources out there to help you along the way and show you that veganism is accessible to a wide variety of people.

Where should I go to learn more about veganism?

Visit my FAQ on veganism or check out The Vegan Society (many of the statistics, definitions and explanations in this post are sourced from their website).

ANIMALS THO

*hannibal voice*: I only eat people because if I didn't they would be overpopulated
*hannibal voice*: well everyone I eat lived a good life before I killed them so
*hannibal voice*: haha my food shits on your food
*hannibal voice*: cannibalism is natural though like other animals do it so it's fine
*hannibal voice*: you don't murder and eat other people? ugh you guys are so extreme
*hannibal voice*: animals tho
bettyrosetattoos:

These two knuckle-heads! 😸❤️ @phillipwolves will be back at @8ofswordstattoo at the end of the month! Email or call for appointments info@8ofswords.com (718) 387-9673 (at Eight of Swords)

My main dude Philip is a gifted artist and a helluva guy.  I’ll be in the shop getting some work done - you should too. #tattodlin
bettyrosetattoos:

These two knuckle-heads! 😸❤️ @phillipwolves will be back at @8ofswordstattoo at the end of the month! Email or call for appointments info@8ofswords.com (718) 387-9673 (at Eight of Swords)

My main dude Philip is a gifted artist and a helluva guy.  I’ll be in the shop getting some work done - you should too. #tattodlin

bettyrosetattoos:

These two knuckle-heads! 😸❤️ @phillipwolves will be back at @8ofswordstattoo at the end of the month! Email or call for appointments info@8ofswords.com (718) 387-9673 (at Eight of Swords)

My main dude Philip is a gifted artist and a helluva guy.  I’ll be in the shop getting some work done - you should too. #tattodlin